The Maldives lies in two rows of atolls in the Indian Ocean, just across the equator. The country is made up of 1,190 coral islands formed around 26 natural ring-like atolls, spread over 90,000 square kilometers. These atolls structures are formed upon a sharp ridge rising from the ocean, making way for their secluded uniqueness.

Each atoll in the Maldives is made of a coral reef encircling a lagoon, with deep channels dividing the reef ring. A string of islands take their places among this atoll ring; each island has its own reef encircling the island lagoon. The reefs of the islands, alive with countless types The reefs of the islands, alive with countless types of underwater creatures and vibrant corals, protect the islands from wind and wave action of the surrounding vast oceans. This unique structure of reefs and channels makes navigation almost impossible for the passer-by without sufficient information about these waters.

Ninety-nine percent of the Maldives is made up of sea. The people of the islands are widely dispersed across the atolls, with about 200 inhabited islands. About 90 islands are developed as tourist resort and the rest are uninhabited or used for agriculture and other livelihood purposes.

Hulhumalé

Hulhumalé is being developed as a modern Smart city with a focus on youth and providing opportunities with the necessary infrastructure to encourage the creative entrepreneurship of the youth of the nation.

In mid 1990s, the idea of creating an artificial island from an existing lagoon and transforming it into a futuristic urban city which would accommodate the excessive population of the central region was born. And the Hulhulé-Farukolhufushi region became the crux of this ambitious vision.

1997
The Phase I of Hulhumalé reclamation, consisting of 188 hectares, began on 16th October 1997 and was completed by June 2002. Primary developments in terms of the required physical and social infrastructure and residential developments were completed in 2004.


2002
The first settlement of Hulhumalé was officially inaugurated on the 12th of May 2004 with a resident population of just over 1,000.

2004
At the end of 2013, Hulhumalé Phase I has reached a population of 30,000, which is the halfway mark of the target population of 60,000 to be achieved at the culmination of Phase I by the year 2020. With this in mind Phase II of Hulhumalé, consisting of 240 hectares, is targeted to be launched in late 2014, catering to a total population of 100,000.

The initial vision of Hulhumalé has broadened to accommodate the growth of Hulhumalé and now envisions the establishment of higher standards in the quality of living in the Maldives. Hulhumalé Phase I and II will be a harmonious combination of residential, commercial and industrial components acting as a catalyst to entice broad based investments in the fields of commerce, education, health, recreation, tourism, fisheries and a number of other related areas by both foreign and local parties.

Youth City
Hulhumalé ‘The City of Hope’ is being developed as a modern Smart city with a focus on youth and providing opportunities with the necessary infrastructure to encourage the creative entrepreneurship of the youth of the nation. ‘Youth City’ developments focus around the Knowledge Park, IT Park etc. planned for the Phase 2 of Hulhumalé. The city, with its upcoming fiber optic network, is designed to incorporate the aspects of a ‘Gigabit Community’ to provide the required ICT Backbone to achieve the speeds to cater for the regional market.

History

For Maldivians, who love a good story, it is somehow fitting that the early history of the country is enshrined in myth and legend.

The Maldives lies in two rows of atolls in the Indian Ocean, just across the equator. The country is made up of 1,190 coral islands formed around 26 natural ring-like atolls, spread over 90,000 square kilometers. These atolls structures are formed upon a sharp ridge rising from the ocean, making way for their secluded uniqueness.

Each atoll in the Maldives is made of a coral reef encircling a lagoon, with deep channels dividing the reef ring. A string of islands take their places among this atoll ring; each island has its own reef encircling the island lagoon. The reefs of the islands, alive with countless types The reefs of the islands, alive with countless types of underwater creatures and vibrant corals, protect the islands from wind and wave action of the surrounding vast oceans. This unique structure of reefs and channels makes navigation almost impossible for the passer-by without sufficient information about these waters.


Ninety-nine percent of the Maldives is made up of sea. The people of the islands are widely dispersed across the atolls, with about 200 inhabited islands. About 90 islands are developed as tourist resort and the rest are uninhabited or used for agriculture and other livelihood purposes.


Ninety-nine percent of the Maldives is made up of sea. The people of the islands are widely dispersed across the atolls, with about 200 inhabited islands. About 90 islands are developed as tourist resort and the rest are uninhabited or used for agriculture and other livelihood purposes.


A traditional bodu beru group in action

Boduberu evolved among the common citizens as an alternative to court music. In the early days, the people gathered together to perform Boduberu, and it became widely accepted as the music of the common people. The performing of the music is often referred as "vibrating the island".

Location and Geography

The Maldives lies in two rows of atolls in the Indian Ocean, just across the equator.

he Maldives lies in two rows of atolls in the Indian Ocean, just across the equator. The country is made up of 1,190 coral islands formed around 26 natural ring-like atolls, spread over 90,000 square kilometers. These atolls structures are formed upon a sharp ridge rising from the ocean, making way for their secluded uniqueness.

Each atoll in the Maldives is made of a coral reef encircling a lagoon, with deep channels dividing the reef ring. A string of islands take their places among this atoll ring; each island has its own reef encircling the island lagoon. The reefs of the islands, alive with countless types of underwater creatures and vibrant corals, protect the islands from wind and wave action of the surrounding vast oceans. This unique structure of reefs and channels makes navigation almost impossible for the passer-by without sufficient information about these waters.

Ninety-nine percent of the Maldives is made up of sea. The people of the islands are widely dispersed across the atolls, with about 200 inhabited islands. About 90 islands are developed as tourist resort and the rest are uninhabited or used for agriculture and other livelihood purposes.

Weather & Climate

With the average temperature at about 30 degrees Celsius throughout the year, the sun is a constant on most days, shining through treetops..


The Maldives lies in two rows of atolls in the Indian Ocean, just across the equator. The country is made up of 1,190 coral islands formed around 26 natural ring-like atolls, spread over 90,000 square kilometers. These atolls structures are formed upon a sharp ridge rising from the ocean, making way for their secluded uniqueness.

Each atoll in the Maldives is made of a coral reef encircling a lagoon, with deep channels dividing the reef ring. A string of islands take their places among this atoll ring; each island has its own reef encircling the island lagoon. The reefs of the islands, alive with countless types of underwater creatures and vibrant corals, protect the islands from wind and wave action of the surrounding vast oceans. This unique structure of reefs and channels makes navigation almost impossible for the passer-by without sufficient information about these waters.

Ninety-nine percent of the Maldives is made up of sea. The people of the islands are widely dispersed across the atolls, with about 200 inhabited islands. About 90 islands are developed as tourist resort and the rest are uninhabited or used for agriculture and other livelihood purposes.